Frankly my dear, I dgaf

Even if you roll your eyes at the forced use of acronyms all around us, you might find DGAF really amusing/handy. DGAF as in “I DGAF about KIMYE, but a veil at your 17th wedding?” DGAF came across my email on a day when I saw OK (as well as o.k., okay and, annoyingly, k – because a two letter word is just too much to type) used as a superlative, an acceptance, and an indicator of a state that is nowhere near bad, horrible or dismal, but also a couple of exits away from ideal, perfect or peachy-keen. Its print presentation echoes the somewhat ambiguous existence. It is a compelling mash-up of O’s eternal rolling-alongness with the kinks and hard stops of K. Continue reading “Frankly my dear, I dgaf”

Fun with letters and patterns

Anagram fun: Can you think of a US Armed Force that is the anagram for the plural noun form of those active in another force?
Newspapers in Arabic, English, Chinese and French as seen in Cairo.
Newspapers in Arabic, English, Chinese and French as seen in Cairo.

As an example, think of this riddle (and I apologize to any Army fans who are insulted by the wording, but I only had four letters to work with.)  What is the anagram of an armed force when its soldier goes wimpy?  Or more PC-  What given name is the anagram of an armed force?
Answer: Army -> <- Mary. Mary -><-Army.  Uma, Oprah. Continue reading “Fun with letters and patterns”